Our History


Confederation Community Center for the Retired has a long proud history. The original name of the park upon which the Center is located was Queen’s Park. The Park was renamed Confederation Park in 1913, in honour of our 1867 Confederation. In 1959 Alderman-Commissioner George McLean met with concerned seniors in North Burnaby to determine their needs and begin planning. In 1961 the School Board owned the entire block bounded by Willingdon, Pandora, Alpha and Albert. In 1967 the School Board donated the land occupied by Confederation Center and the Library. In return the School Board received an equal amount of Confederation Park at the corner of Willingdon and Pandora.

Confederation Center was constructed with combined Federal/Provincial/Municipal participation, through the Special Development Loan Program. The Center was built in 1971. The building was designed by architect, Norman S. Jones. The construction was carried by Lickney, Johnson, Palmer Construction Ltd. The total project, including landscaping and consulting fees, cost $200,000. A sod-turning ceremony was held on Friday, June 11, 1971. The official opening by the Burnaby Parks & Recreation Department was held on November 30, 1971. Furnishings for the building were donated by the North Burnaby Community Center Association and the George Cross Chapter, Order of the Daughters of the Empire. Financial donations were contributed by Old Age Pension Organizations #22 and #26, and Senior Citizens’ Association #41.

In recognition of the success of the Center and the growth of the senior population in North Burnaby, the Burnaby Parks and Recreation Department added 5,000 sq. ft. and renovated 4,700 existing sq. ft. in 1988. The construction cost for the project was approximately 1 million dollars. As well Confederation Center's Building Committee contributed over $180,000 in furnishings and equipment. The new and enlarged Center reopened its door October 1, 1988. In recognition of its achievements, past and present, Confederation Center was awarded the British Columbia Recreation and Parks Association 1989 Award of Merit as the Recreation Center that best exemplified community spirit and continuous volunteer involvement and achievement. The Award was presented at the B.C.R.P.A. Annual Conference.

Burnaby Senior Citizens of Confederation House Association, representing all members of Confederation Center, passed the reins to the Confederation Seniors’ Association (CSA) at the 1995 Annual General Meeting. The CSA’s new Constitution was accepted in Victoria and Ottawa as a registered non-profit organization in 1996. The partnership formed between the Confederation Seniors’ Association and the Burnaby Parks and Recreation Department has enabled members to be integral in the delivery of programs and services for Burnaby seniors.